Friday, August 17th, 2018

Isn’t drug testing expensive?


“I recognise the need for testing but isn’t it an expensive process?”

No, it isn’t. Using the ITS high-quality tests for initial screening is relatively inexpensive and most companies who adopt a robust and active Policy benefit from a number of hidden cost savings, lower absenteeism, greater productivity and fewer costly accidents/incidents. Using lower quality and inferior tests can lead to erroneous results, resulting in a lack of confidence in the Policy/Procedures, more challenges (and therefore more management time) and costly employee tribunal or legal cases. The average cost of an employee tribunal can easily exceed £15000 – never mind the time required. What is the cost of a life lost through an accident? What is the cost of claims and legal expenses due to accidents or incidents? Corporate manslaughter / Corporate homicide? The question might be, can you afford not to introduce a policy?

£3 Billion per year, is the estimated cost to British industry from drug and alcohol related problems. An employee tribunal can easily cost in excess of £15,000. An investigation by the HSE can result in businesses closing (temporary or permanently), very hefty fines and possibly prison sentences for those found at fault.


Recent Posts

185 drivers failed roadside drug tests

185 drivers failed roadside drug tests

Police Scotland say 185 drivers failed roadside drug tests during their festive campaign. For the 1st time officers were able to test for drugs at the roadside. Drug tests for cannabis & cocaine resulted in 185 positive results from 480 drivers stopped. Almost 600 motorists breathalysed between 1 Dec-2 Jan were under the influence of drink/drugs. A total of 8687 drivers were stopped over the period, with 580 of those detected for drink/drug offences. 29 drivers were caught the morning after they had been drinking.

Alcohol Awareness Week

Alcohol Awareness Week

Charity Alcohol Change UK have announced Alcohol Awareness Week (AAW) 2019 will take place from 11-17 November. Are you / your workplace doing anything to support and promote Alcohol Awareness Week?

New controls over prescription drugs Pregabalin and Gabapentin following rising fatalities

New controls over prescription drugs Pregabalin and Gabapentin following rising fatalities

Pregabalin and Gabapentin to be controlled as class C drugs from April 2019 Prescription drugs pregabalin and gabapentin are to be reclassified as class C controlled substances from April 2019, the government announced on 15 October 2018. The move comes after experts highlighted rising numbers of fatalities linked to the drugs. The change means it will be illegal to possess pregabalin and gabapentin without a prescription and it will be illegal to supply or sell them to others.