Thursday, September 6th, 2018

What do I do if I get a “POC Positive” result?


With any screening process (either carried out at a laboratory or via a “Point of Care” drug test device/kit) you will inevitably get “false positives”, “false negatives”, “real negatives” and “real positives”. “False negatives” are rarely challenged by the sample donor – e.g. why would an employee argue that they were negative for drugs? All “POC positive” results (also known as “non-negative” and/or “presumed positive” screen results) should be confirmed via a UKAS accredited laboratory confirmatory analysis – such as LCMS, GCMS or similar. This confirmation result, together with a report from a Medical Review Officer when applicable, is considered as the definitive result.


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