Friday, August 17th, 2018

What do the abbreviations on the drug testing kits mean?


AMP – Amphetamine
BAR – Barbiturates
BZO – Benzodiazepine
BUP – Buprenorphine
COC – Cocaine
FYL – Fentanyl
6-MAM – Heroin Specific
K2- Spice
KET – Ketamine
THC – Marijuana/Cannabis
MTD – Methadone
EDDP – Methadone Metabolite
MET – Methamphetamine
OPI – Opiates
OXY – Oxycodone
PCP – Phencyclidine
PPX – Propoxyphene
K3 – Spice/Synthetic Cannabis


Recent Posts

Cocaine and Alcohol Combined

Cocaine and Alcohol Combined

The UK has always had a serious alcohol problem, what hapens when cocaine and alcohol are combined? Binge drinking culture is rampant to this day, with UK citizens being drunk more often than any other country. As most know, the party context within which cocaine is often used means many consume the drug alongside alcohol; over half of cocaine users do, in recent studies. The problem here is significant. When cocaine is consumed alongside alcohol, both of the substances are metabolised at the same time in the body’s liver. When this happens, cocaethylene is formed. When this accrues inside us, it can pose a serious & direct threat to the function of our cardiovascular systems.

What is the level of drug use in the UK really like?

What is the level of drug use in the UK really like?

We often get asked “what is the level of drug use in the UK really like?”. It has been shown that workplace drinkers are more likely to be men than women, managers rather than their staff and single as apposed to being married. Alcoholism and drug dependence can lead to lowered productivity within the workplace, with increased levels of absenteeism and sick leave, accidents and injuries, including fatal accidents and even premature deaths. Substance abuse is linked to 60% of all poor performances and 40% of industrial accidents at work. 83% of employees who have had a hangover at work admit that it affected their productivity, 33% admit to having gone to work with a hangover, and 22% admit to having made mistakes at work because of a hangover.

Dangerous driving link to heavy drug users

Dangerous driving link to heavy drug users

Running red lights, driving at high speeds, crossing center lines into the other lanes, getting into accidents and even hitting pedestrians. A new study found these were some of the dangerous driving behaviors of regular, heavy users (4 or 5 times per week) of recreational weed who began using before the age of 16. Here's the catch: users drove this badly even when they were no longer “high”. At the time of driving experience, the marijuana group had not used for at least 12 hrs. Despite having little THC in their system, heavy users consistently performed worse on driving tasks than non-users. This can result in them making critical, dangerous mistakes. And when they looked at the cannabis users & separated those into early (before age 16) versus later onset of use, almost exclusively these differences between the 2 groups were attributed to the early onset group.